Category Archives: bond funds

Early Retirement Portfolio & Plan

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Thank you for reading part-4 in my series on asset allocation.  In my last post, I wrote about our current balanced-growth asset allocation.  That is the asset allocation that we plan on maintaining until we retire in 2028.

In this post, I will be considering the future.  This post is about how I foresee our assets being allocated at the time of retirement.  I use the word foresee because it is what I am anticipating.  As I stated in my previous post, I don’t have a crystal ball.  Nobody can predict the future, but this is what I am optimistically forecasting.

At the time of retirement, I will be age 52 and my wife will be age 60.  At age 60, my wife will draw a Pension equal to 70% of her last annual salary.  The Pension technically has a cost of living adjustment (COLA), but there has not been an adjustment in over 15 years.  Moving forward, we are not going to count on any COLA adjustments.

By 2028, we plan on having about 50 years of annual living expenses in investable assets.  To come up with that amount, I have run our figures on many different financial calculators including AARP, Charles Schwab, and Fidelity that take future projected growth of different asset allocations into account.  The 50 years of living expenses is based on what we currently have saved, the amount we plan on adding to our savings, as well as projected market performance.

The asset allocation that we plan on using at retirement will be 50% invested in stocks and 50% invested in bonds/cash:

S&P 500 Index Fund – 32%

Extended Market Index Fund – 8%

Total International Stock Market Index Fund – 10%

Intermediate Term Bond Fund – 32%

TIPS Fund – 10

Cash – 8%


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At retirement, we are planning on withdrawing only 1.8% per year from our portfolio.  Based on the Vanguard Monte Carlo Nest Egg Calculator, our success rate is projected to be 100%.  We also have a greater than 100% projected success rate on Firecalc.com and the Trinity study.

Between the pension and withdrawing 1.8% from our portfolio, we will have $112K per year to live on.  Just based on simple math, if we are taxed at 25%, we would have $7K per month to live on.  That would be more than double of what we live on now with less expenses.

For the first 10 years of retirement, we plan on withdrawing from our taxable account.  When my wife is age 70, we will be forced to withdraw from her Traditional IRA because of Required Minimum Distributions (RMD).  At that point, we will still be 8 years away from having to withdraw from my Traditional IRA.  We might never have to touch our Roth IRA accounts.  If we do use our Roth IRA accounts, it might just be to withdraw extra money without causing us to go into a higher tax bracket.

We are currently planning on being flexible when it comes to Social Security.  Our goal is to take it when my wife is 70 and I am 62.  We are, however, keeping the option open of taking it early based on retiring during a prolonged market correction. Otherwise, the amount that we will collect will compound 7% annually for every year my wife waits between age 62 and 70.

For some people, this plan might seem too conservative.  For me, being a little on the conservative side is important.  That is because I am retiring at a young age.  I have to plan on being able to fund a retirement of at least 35 years for both my wife and myself.

For me, I don’t see it as being overly conservative.  I see it more as being flexible.  By only planning on a 1.8% withdrawal rate, we have a great amount of flexibility.  If we had to increase it to 2.8%, our success rate only falls to 98% on the Vanguard Monte Carlo Nest Egg Calculator.  If my wife had to work two more additional years, her pension would jump to 80% of her last annual salary.  Also, I will most likely still work part-time because I want continue to take advantage of my catch-up contributions in my retirement accounts.

That is how our future plan looks.  It is over 11 years from now.  I don’t want to get too excited.  Between now and then, we will work hard, save, invest, take care of our health, and enjoy every day.

Also, please check out the following links from some of the top personal finance blogs to learn about the #Drawdown Strategy Chain:

Anchor: Physician On Fire: Our Drawdown Plan in Early Retirement

Link 1: The Retirement Manifesto: Our Retirement Investment Drawdown Strategy

Link 2: OthalaFehu: Retirement Master Plan

Link 3: Plan.Invest.Escape: Drawdown vs. Wealth Preservation in Early Retirement

Link 4: Freedom is Groovy: The Groovy Drawdown Strategy

Link 5: The Green Swan: The Nastiest, Hardest Problem in Finance

Link 6: My Curiosity Lab: Show Me The Money: My Retirement Drawdown Plan

Link 6:    My Curiosity Lab:  Show Me The Money: My Retirement Drawdown Plan

Link 7: Cracking Retirement: Our Drawdown Strategy

 

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Balanced-Growth Portfolio

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Welcome to Part-3 of my series on asset allocation.  In my last post, I wrote about Adding Bonds To Reduce Volatility in the portfolio that my wife and I held for the past ten years.  In this post, I am going to write about our new asset allocation.  This is the allocation that we will hold until we reach early retirement (FIRE).

As a Financial Independence (FI) blogger, I have always been a portfolio nerd.  The Lazy Portfolios made popular by Paul B. Farrell on marketwatch.com and his book The Lazy Person’s Guide to Investing have always been something that I have enjoyed following.  It is interesting to analyze the performance of famous portfolios like the Coffeehouse Portfolio, Yale’s Unconventional Portfolio, the Second Graders Starter Portfolio, as well as others.

The portfolio that I would like to introduce to you is what I call The Sweet Dreams Portfolio.  The portfolio is named after what it provides for us.  It is a portfolio that allows us to sleep well at night in spite of all the scary headlines that can easily cause nightmares from the sensationalized financial and political media.

This portfolio has a balanced-growth asset allocation.  Based on the Vanguard portfolio allocation model, a portfolio made up of 60% stocks and 40% bonds is classified as a balanced portfolio.  Vanguard classifies a portfolio of 70% stocks and 30% bonds as a growth portfolio.  The Sweet Dream’s portfolio is 65% stocks and 35% bonds.  The Sweet Dreams portfolio is made up of the same funds that we used in our previous asset allocation.

The Sweet Dreams Portfolio:

S&P 500 – 38%

Extended Market Index Fund – 11%

Total International Stock Market Fund – 16%

Total Bond Market – 35%


You might be asking, why not just use the total stock market instead of using a S&P 500 and an extended market fund?  The answer to that question is that these are the options that my wife and I have available in our 403B accounts.  A total stock market fund has the same market weighted allocation of a 4:1 ratio and can be used in place of those two funds.

You might also be asking, why don’t I have the names and ticker symbols listed for these funds?  Again, the answer is based on what we have available for investment options.  Our Roth IRA’s and taxable funds are invested with Vanguard.  My 403B has index funds from Fidelity.  My wife’s 403B plan has index funds from Charles Schwab.  This asset allocation can be created with index funds from any of those companies.

In my first two posts in this series, I wrote from a position of experience.  In those two posts, I was able to look back at how my asset allocation performed over long periods of time.  Those posts were also about how I responded during different market conditions.

The Sweet Dreams Portfolio is a brand new asset allocation model for us.  There is no such thing as a crystal ball that I can use to see into the future.  We can only look backwards at how an asset allocation performed during different market conditions.

Over the past 10 years, The Sweet Dreams Portfolio returned an average of 6.34% per year.  The largest one year loss was in 2008 with a -24% loss.  An initial investment of $10K would have grown to nearly $20K if re-balanced annually.

Over the past 20 years, The Sweet Dreams Portfolio returned an average of 6.91%. The worst one year loss over the period of 20 years was still in 2008.  An initial investment of $10K would have grown to more than $38K if re-balanced annually.

At the age of 40, I still have a long investing horizon.  It is not as long as others because of our goal to retire in less than 12 years.  We are comfortable with the 65% invested in equities for growth.  We are also comfortable with the 35% invested in bonds to use as a re-balancing tool during market corrections.  Ultimately, we are comfortable with the thought of having restful nights and sweet dreams as we work toward our next goal on this financial journey.

Please keep an eye out for the 4th and final part of this series.  The final post in this series will be about how we plan on structuring the asset allocation of our retirement portfolio when we reach early retirement (FIRE).  The final post will also include how we plan on funding our retirement based on investment withdrawal rates, pensions, and Social Security.

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Bonds to Reduce Volatility

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During the first ten years of my investing career, my asset allocation was solely invested in stocks.  From 1997 until 2007, my portfolio returned 8.5%.  I wrote about that period in my first post of this series 100 Percent Invested in Stocks.  In this post, I will write about how adding bonds to my portfolio reduced volatility during the decade that followed.

By the year 2007, my portfolio had five years of positive returns.  At that time, I was reading a good amount of Jack Bogle’s writings on asset allocation.  He suggested holding (100 – your age) in stocks.

After investing for 10 years, it made sense for me to reduce the volatility of my portfolio.  However, I still was focused on aggressive growth because I had the goal of retiring early.  I felt an asset allocation equal to my age in bonds was too conservative.

Another factor that I had to consider was that I was newly married.  Prior to getting married, my wife and I decided to manage all our finances together.  We sat down and evaluated how we wanted to invest our money after we were married.

At that point, I was 30 years old and my wife was 37.  We decided on adding 25% of our portfolio to bonds.  It was close to equaling (110 – our average age) in stocks.

This is how our new asset allocation looked:

S&P 500 Fund – 43%

Extended Market Index Fund – 13%

Total International Stock Market Index Fund – 19%

Total Bond Market Index Fund – 25%

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My second decade as an investor was equally as volatile as my first decade. In 2007, our portfolio was off to a solid start by returning over 10%.  Then 2008 came.  That was the beginning of the great recession that resulted from the subprime mortgage bubble bursting.  In 2008, our portfolio had a loss of more than -30%.  If I had my original asset allocation of 100% invested in stocks, we would have lost more than -40%.

Just as during the dot.com bubble and the three years of negative returns that followed, we just kept investing and moving forward.  We stuck to our normal schedule of dollar cost averaging.  We also stuck to our plan of semi-annual rebalancing.

Fortunately, the market bottomed out in March of 2009 and one of the greatest bull markets began.  By the middle of 2010, we had recovered all of our losses. From 2009 to 2016, our portfolio averaged over 10.5% annually.

That 10.5% return did not occur without volatility.  During this period, there were peaks and valleys along the way.  There were budget crises, polarizing politics, debt-ceiling debacles, federal government shutdowns, and threats of austerity.

Over the course of those ten years, our portfolio had an average return of 5.24%.  If we were invested in 100% stocks the average return would have only been 5.58%.  By adding 25% in bonds, there was almost zero impact on growth.  The bonds did help to reduce volatility.

If you are not comfortable with having 100% of your portfolio invested in stocks, consider adding some bonds to your allocation.  Bonds are susceptible to interest rate increases, currently have low yields, and do not hold up as well as stocks during periods of inflation. Bonds do, however, reduce volatility when the stock market is in decline.  That is the main reason why they have an important role in our asset allocation.

Please keep an eye out for Part-3 in my series on asset allocation.  In Part-3, I will write about the balanced-growth asset allocation that we will hold until we reach early retirement (FIRE).

Please remember to check with a financial professional before you ever buy an investment and to read my Disclaimer page.

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