Category Archives: stock market investing

Balanced-Growth Portfolio

It's simple and only we have it!

Welcome to Part-3 of my series on asset allocation.  In my last post, I wrote about Adding Bonds To Reduce Volatility in the portfolio that my wife and I held for the past ten years.  In this post, I am going to write about our new asset allocation.  This is the allocation that we will hold until we reach early retirement (FIRE).

As a Financial Independence (FI) blogger, I have always been a portfolio nerd.  The Lazy Portfolios made popular by Paul B. Farrell on marketwatch.com and his book The Lazy Person’s Guide to Investing have always been something that I have enjoyed following.  It is interesting to analyze the performance of famous portfolios like the Coffeehouse Portfolio, Yale’s Unconventional Portfolio, the Second Graders Starter Portfolio, as well as others.

The portfolio that I would like to introduce to you is what I call The Sweet Dreams Portfolio.  The portfolio is named after what it provides for us.  It is a portfolio that allows us to sleep well at night in spite of all the scary headlines that can easily cause nightmares from the sensationalized financial and political media.

This portfolio has a balanced-growth asset allocation.  Based on the Vanguard portfolio allocation model, a portfolio made up of 60% stocks and 40% bonds is classified as a balanced portfolio.  Vanguard classifies a portfolio of 70% stocks and 30% bonds as a growth portfolio.  The Sweet Dream’s portfolio is 65% stocks and 35% bonds.  The Sweet Dreams portfolio is made up of the same funds that we used in our previous asset allocation.

The Sweet Dreams Portfolio:

S&P 500 – 38%

Extended Market Index Fund – 11%

Total International Stock Market Fund – 16%

Total Bond Market – 35%


You might be asking, why not just use the total stock market instead of using a S&P 500 and an extended market fund?  The answer to that question is that these are the options that my wife and I have available in our 403B accounts.  A total stock market fund has the same market weighted allocation of a 4:1 ratio and can be used in place of those two funds.

You might also be asking, why don’t I have the names and ticker symbols listed for these funds?  Again, the answer is based on what we have available for investment options.  Our Roth IRA’s and taxable funds are invested with Vanguard.  My 403B has index funds from Fidelity.  My wife’s 403B plan has index funds from Charles Schwab.  This asset allocation can be created with index funds from any of those companies.

In my first two posts in this series, I wrote from a position of experience.  In those two posts, I was able to look back at how my asset allocation performed over long periods of time.  Those posts were also about how I responded during different market conditions.

The Sweet Dreams Portfolio is a brand new asset allocation model for us.  There is no such thing as a crystal ball that I can use to see into the future.  We can only look backwards at how an asset allocation performed during different market conditions.

Over the past 10 years, The Sweet Dreams Portfolio returned an average of 6.34% per year.  The largest one year loss was in 2008 with a -24% loss.  An initial investment of $10K would have grown to nearly $20K if re-balanced annually.

Over the past 20 years, The Sweet Dreams Portfolio returned an average of 6.91%. The worst one year loss over the period of 20 years was still in 2008.  An initial investment of $10K would have grown to more than $38K if re-balanced annually.

At the age of 40, I still have a long investing horizon.  It is not as long as others because of our goal to retire in less than 12 years.  We are comfortable with the 65% invested in equities for growth.  We are also comfortable with the 35% invested in bonds to use as a re-balancing tool during market corrections.  Ultimately, we are comfortable with the thought of having restful nights and sweet dreams as we work toward our next goal on this financial journey.

Please keep an eye out for the 4th and final part of this series.  The final post in this series will be about how we plan on structuring the asset allocation of our retirement portfolio when we reach early retirement (FIRE).  The final post will also include how we plan on funding our retirement based on investment withdrawal rates, pensions, and Social Security.

Please remember to check with a financial professional before you ever buy an investment and to read my Disclaimer page.Shop HeartlandAmerica.com Today!

100 Percent Invested in Stocks

.

Purity You Can Taste

Do you think you have the risk tolerance to invest 100% of your portfolio in equities?  I had an asset allocation of 100% invested in equities for over 10 years.  At this stage in my life, However, I no longer have the need or desire to have that asset allocation.  That was how my portfolio was invested when I reached my first milestone of Saving $100,000 by age 30.

This is the first of a 4-post series about my asset allocation.  This series on asset allocation is about my asset allocation at different points in my investing career.  The series is based on where I started, what happened, where I am at now, and were I will be heading based on age and risk tolerance.

My investing career began in 1997.  This was a time Alan Greenspan referred to as a period of irrational exuberance.  The stock market was soaring.  The S&P 500 had an average return of over 15% per year from 1989 to 1999.  If a person invested $100 in the Vanguard 500 Index Fund (VFINX) in 1989, it would have grown to $692 by 1999.

In 1997, I purchased my first mutual fund.  My first fund was the Vanguard 500 index fund (VFINX).  This was the only investment that I owned from 1997 until 2000.  I would purchase at least $500 worth of this funds shares per month.  Over that 3-year period, the Vanguard 500 averaged a return of nearly 20% per year.

In 2000, as the result of my savings and market returns, my portfolio was large enough to add more funds.  To improve my diversification, I wanted to add small caps and international stocks to my asset allocation.  I added the Vanguard Extended Market Index Fund (VEXMX).  By adding the Vanguard Extended Market Index fund to my portfolio, I could replicate the total stock market because I already owned the Vanguard 500 Index Fund.  The third fund that was added was the Vanguard Total International Stock Market Index Fund (VGTSX) for international exposure.

My asset allocation was:

Vanguard 500 Index Fund – 60%

Vanguard Extended Market Index Fund – 15%

Vanguard Total International Index Fund – 25%


Open an Ally Invest brokerage account!

As far as equities are concerned, my new portfolio was diversified.  It contained every major publicly traded U.S. and international stock.  In my mind, I was ready for the new century and another decade of 20% annual returns.

It did not take long for things to change for the worse.  In March of 2000, the dot.com bubble burst.  On September 11, 2001, New York City and Washington D.C. were attacked by terrorists.  By 2003, the U.S. was fighting two wars in Afghanistan and Iraq.  Those unfortunate events drove the U.S. economy into an extended recession.

As the result of those events, the stock market posted losses for three consecutive years.  The average annual  return on my portfolio was a loss of -16%.  In other words, if I invested $100 in January or 2000, it was worth $61 by January of 2003.

How did I handle the prolonged recession and market contraction of the early 2000s?  Honestly, I stayed the course.  I dollar cost averaged the same amount of money into my investments every month.  My goal was to reach financial independence, so I rode out those volatile markets and took advantage of buying equities at a reduced price.  I would, however, feel unnerved when I paid attention to the media.  Fortunately, I was too busy working and going to college to become obsessed with the media.  I honestly do not remember ever feeling overly panicked during this period.

My patience did ultimately pay off.  By sticking with my allocation, I was rewarded handsomely between 2003 and 2007.  Over the course of those next five years, my portfolio had an average return of more than 16% per year.

During my first 10 years as an investor, my portfolio returned slightly more than 8.5% per year.  This asset allocation, however, was extremely volatile.  The best year returned 34% and the worst year had a loss of -20%.

An asset allocation of 100% invested in stocks is not suited for every investor.  It worked for me because I was young and able to dollar cost average when the market was both up and down.  This type of volatility does cause many investors to sell low and buy high.  That is a losing game if you want to reach financial independence.  If you cannot honestly handle a -40% drop in the value your portfolio, then a portfolio made up of 100% stocks might be too aggressive for you.

There is a simple solution if the volatility of a portfolio invested in 100% stocks causes you to feel insecure.  Add a percentage of bonds to your portfolio that matches your risk tolerance.  In my next post, I will write about how adding bonds to my asset allocation reduced the market volatility of the next decade.

Please remember to check with a financial professional before you ever buy an investment and to read my Disclaimer page.

Credit Reports you can use!