Tag Archives: Charles Schwab

Investing in Your 20s – It’s the Chance of Your Lifetime

No matter how old you are, it is never too early to start investing. Whether you are in high school, college or just finished school, now is the time to start putting money toward securing your financial future. The good news is that it is easy to start investing no matter how much you have to invest, what your risk tolerance is or what your goals may be.

How Do You Start Investing?

The first step to becoming an investor is to find a broker to trade with. Most brokers allow you to make your own trades online in a matter of seconds. They will also have access to charts, analysis and news to help you make informed trading decisions.

Some brokers also offer training courses that help new investors learn the basics of investing as well as how to use the charts and tools that they offer. The broker that you choose depends partially on how much help that you want or need making investment decisions as well as how much that you have to invest at the moment.

How Much Do You Need to Start Investing?

Some brokers such as Charles Schwab will allow you to start investing with no minimum balance. Therefore, you can start contributing to an index fund with as little as $1 if that is all you had to invest or all that you wanted to put in for now.

Newer brokers such as Betterment or Motif require anywhere from $100 to $300 to get started whereas some mobile investing apps have no limits. If you invest with Fidelity, Vanguard or similar brokers, expect to need at least $1,000 to gain access to their stock or mutual fund offerings.

Why Should I Start Investing Today?

Compound interest is one of the most exciting concepts that you will ever learn. It is also the reason why you need to start putting money into the market today no matter how much or how little you have to get started with.

Let’s say that you bought stock worth $100 at age 30 and earned the historical average return of 11 percent per year. When you were 60, that $100 would be worth $2,289. However, if you put that $100 into the market when you were 20, you would have $6,500 by age 60 assuming an average 11 percent return.

What Should I Know About Broker Fees and Capital Gains Taxes ?

It is important that you account for taxes and fees whenever you make an investment decision. When you first start investing, you will likely look to buy and hold a stock or index fund for many years. This is because most brokers charge a fee of $5 to $8 for each trade that you make. If you only have $100 in an account, that $8 may represent your return for an entire year.

When it comes to taxes, it is important to note that you only pay tax on the profit that is made on a given investment. Your profit is any gains above your cost basis, which is the price of the security plus any fees paid to buy or sell it. Therefore, if you bought a stock for $10 and paid $5 to buy it, your cost basis is $15. If you sold the stock for $20, you would pay capital gains taxes on $5.

If you are in the 10 percent tax bracket, you pay nothing in federal capital gains taxes. However, you may be required to pay state taxes on all capital gains. If the money is held in a traditional IRA, you don’t pay capital gains taxes while securities are in your account. Instead, you pay ordinary income taxes on any money that you withdraw when the withdrawal takes place.

Should I Open a Roth IRA or 401k Instead of a Traditional?

When you invest in a traditional IRA or 401k, you get a tax deduction in the year that the contribution is made. However, if you choose to open a Roth account, you use after-tax dollars to contribute to your account.

The benefit is that the money in your account grows free from capital gains taxes. Furthermore, it is not subject to income taxes when it is withdrawn because the money was already taxed.

Ideally, a person will invest in both a traditional and Roth IRA or 401k to reduce their tax burden both today and in the future. As a Roth IRA is subject to income limits, it may be best to contribute to a Roth 401k as there are no income limits and contribution limits are higher. A 401k is a retirement account provided by an employer, and those who are self-employed may open one on their own.

If you are serious about securing your financial future, you should start investing as soon as you have a few extra dollars to do so. Those who aren’t sure what their financial goals or timelines are may benefit from speaking with a financial adviser. This person may be able to help you create short and long-term goals as well as different investment strategies to make it easier to meet them.

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Please remember to check with a financial professional before you ever buy an investment and to read my Disclaimer Page.

Early Retirement Portfolio & Plan

Thank you for reading part-4 in my series on asset allocation.  In my last post, I wrote about our current balanced-growth asset allocation.  That is the asset allocation that we plan on maintaining until we retire in 2028.

In this post, I will be considering the future.  This post is about how I foresee our assets being allocated at the time of retirement.  I use the word foresee because it is what I am anticipating.  As I stated in my previous post, I don’t have a crystal ball.  Nobody can predict the future, but this is what I am optimistically forecasting.

At the time of retirement, I will be age 52 and my wife will be age 60.  At age 60, my wife will draw a Pension equal to 70% of her last annual salary.  The Pension technically has a cost of living adjustment (COLA), but there has not been an adjustment in over 15 years.  Moving forward, we are not going to count on any COLA adjustments.

By 2028, we plan on having about 50 years of annual living expenses in investable assets.  To come up with that amount, I have run our figures on many different financial calculators including AARP, Charles Schwab, and Fidelity that take future projected growth of different asset allocations into account.  The 50 years of living expenses is based on what we currently have saved, the amount we plan on adding to our savings, as well as projected market performance.

The asset allocation that we plan on using at retirement will be 50% invested in stocks and 50% invested in bonds/cash:

S&P 500 Index Fund – 32%

Extended Market Index Fund – 8%

Total International Stock Market Index Fund – 10%

Intermediate Term Bond Fund – 32%

TIPS Fund – 10

Cash – 8%

At retirement, we are planning on withdrawing only 1.8% per year from our portfolio.  Based on the Vanguard Monte Carlo Nest Egg Calculator, our success rate is projected to be 100%.  We also have a greater than 100% projected success rate on Firecalc.com and the Trinity study.

Between the pension and withdrawing 1.8% from our portfolio, we will have $112K per year to live on.  Just based on simple math, if we are taxed at 25%, we would have $7K per month to live on.  That would be more than double of what we live on now with less expenses.

For the first 10 years of retirement, we plan on withdrawing from our taxable account.  When my wife is age 70, we will be forced to withdraw from her Traditional IRA because of Required Minimum Distributions (RMD).  At that point, we will still be 8 years away from having to withdraw from my Traditional IRA.  We might never have to touch our Roth IRA accounts.  If we do use our Roth IRA accounts, it might just be to withdraw extra money without causing us to go into a higher tax bracket.

We are currently planning on being flexible when it comes to Social Security.  Our goal is to take it when my wife is 70 and I am 62.  We are, however, keeping the option open of taking it early based on retiring during a prolonged market correction. Otherwise, the amount that we will collect will compound 7% annually for every year my wife waits between age 62 and 70.

For some people, this plan might seem too conservative.  For me, being a little on the conservative side is important.  That is because I am retiring at a young age.  I have to plan on being able to fund a retirement of at least 35 years for both my wife and myself.

For me, I don’t see it as being overly conservative.  I see it more as being flexible.  By only planning on a 1.8% withdrawal rate, we have a great amount of flexibility.  If we had to increase it to 2.8%, our success rate only falls to 98% on the Vanguard Monte Carlo Nest Egg Calculator.  If my wife had to work two more additional years, her pension would jump to 80% of her last annual salary.  Also, I will most likely still work part-time because I want continue to take advantage of my catch-up contributions in my retirement accounts.

That is how our future plan looks.  It is over 11 years from now.  I don’t want to get too excited.  Between now and then, we will work hard, save, invest, take care of our health, and enjoy every day.

Also, please check out the following links from some of the top personal finance blogs to learn about the #DrawdownStrategy Chain:

Anchor: Physician On Fire: Our Drawdown Plan in Early Retirement

Link 1: The Retirement Manifesto: Our Retirement Investment Drawdown Strategy

Link 2: OthalaFehu: Retirement Master Plan

Link 3: Plan.Invest.Escape: Drawdown vs. Wealth Preservation in Early Retirement

Link 4: Freedom is Groovy: The Groovy Drawdown Strategy

Link 5: The Green Swan: The Nastiest, Hardest Problem in Finance

Link 6: My Curiosity Lab: Show Me The Money: My Retirement Drawdown Plan

Link 7: Cracking Retirement: Our Drawdown Strategy

Link 8: The Financial Journeyman: Early Retirement Portfolio & Plan

Link 9: Retire by 40: Our Unusual Early Retirement Withdrawal Strategy

Link 10: Early Retirement Now: The ERN Family Early Retirement Captial Preservation Plan

Link 11: 39 Months: Mr. 39 Months Drawdown Plan

Link 12: 7 Circles: Drawdown Strategy – Joining The Chain Gang

Link 13: Retirement Starts Today: What’s Your Retirement Withdrawal Strategy?

Link 14: Ms. Liz Money Matters: How I’ll Fund My Retirement

Link 15a: Dads Dollars Debts: DDD Drawdown part 1: Living With a Pension

Link 15b: Dads Dollars Debts: DDD Drawdown part 2: Retire at 48?

Link 16: Penny & Rich: Rich’s Retirement Plan

Link 17: Atypical Life: Our Retirement Drawdown Strategy

Link 18: New Retirement: 5 Steps for Defining your Retirement Drawdown Strategy

Link 19: Maximize Your Money: Practical Retirement Withdrawal Strategies Are Important

Please remember to check with a financial professional before you ever buy an investment and to read my Disclaimer page.