Tag Archives: Community Service

Money & Happiness

Money can do many things.  If you have money, you can live life to the fullest.  Money enables people to cover all their necessities including food, shelter, and healthcare.  Having money is a key requirement to get the best education in the classroom and by way of traveling the world.  Money is also required if you want to add convenience and have some luxury in your life.  Money is tied to almost every aspect of life, but can money buy happiness?

In 2010, a study was conducted to determine if happiness can be increased when income is increased.  These researchers found out that it can.  There were limits though.  The researchers discovered that happiness increased with income, but only up to the amount of $75,000 per year.  People who earned over $75,000 were not happier than those who earned $75,000.

That sounded reasonable to me.  $75,000 would be enough to live a reasonably comfortable life in most parts of the country excluding New York City, San Francisco, or some of the other major coastal cities.  Even in smaller markets, $75,000 will not be enough to afford a first-class lifestyle.  It should be enough, however, to cover your needs, some wants, and have enough left to save for retirement.

A more recent study was conducted by Researchers from Harvard Business School.  This survey was given to 400 millionaires.  They were asked to rate their happiness based on a scale of 1 to 10.  This study found that the people who had at least $8,000,000 were happier than those with less than that amount.  Many agreed that they would be happier with even a little more wealth.  Most felt that they needed much more than what they currently have.  To score a perfect 10 on this happiness survey, the results stated that the millionaires who took this survey would need to have a 1,000% increase in their net worth.

In my opinion, money can buy many things, but I do not know if it can buy true happiness.  There have been times in my life when I had very little money.  Based on my current lifestyle and expenses, I have enough money to live for a couple of decades without having to work.  I feel blessed, but I do not think I am happier today compared to when I was just starting out.

Obviously, life is better with money compared to being broke, but I do not know if there is much of a difference on the happiness scale.  I view having money as the means to more options in life.  That makes me happy.  In my opinion, money equals freedom to live a life on my own terms.  That also makes me happy.

I just don’t think that money itself makes me happy.  Money pays the bills and allows me to buy things.  I am not overly materialist and don’t want for much.  Material possessions generally do not make me happy.

Accomplishment

There are a few things in life that make me truly happy.  The first is when I accomplish a goal.  Even though I am focused on early retirement, I do get a great feeling when I accomplish a goal at work.  It is not based on the praise from others.  It comes from that internal sense of accomplishment.  The same feeling of satisfaction can be found when I accomplish a home improvement project, complete a workout, finish a book, or make an improvement to my blog.  For example, I am happy that you took the time to read this post.

Laughter

I also find joy in the simple things in life.  Laughter makes me happy.  I take my work and my goals seriously, however, I do not take myself seriously.  I have been humbled enough times to say that my ego is right-sized.  A therapist friend of mine recently told me that a good sign of emotional intelligence is to have a good sense of humor and the ability to laugh.  I find it therapeutic to laugh at myself as well as to laugh at the absurdities of life.  I am also happy when other people laugh.

Nature

Spending time in the outdoors makes me happy.  I love going to the local park with my wife and our dog.  It feels great to breathe in the fresh air while hiking the trails and to take in the wildlife.  One of my favorite hobbies is spending an afternoon in my kayak bass fishing.  There are few things more exciting than catching a bass on a topwater lure.

Service

The closest that I have ever come to experiencing true happiness is when I am being of service to others.  In my experience, if you want to find pure joy, go and volunteer at your local soup kitchen.  The fear of stock market volatility quickly vanishes when you tune into the needs of those who truly have nothing.

Helping people who are less fortunate than myself gives me gratitude that lasts for weeks.  It puts my problems into perspective.  These people are not thinking about finding investments with the lowest expense ratios or finding ways to pay fewer taxes on capital gains.  These folks are literally wondering where their next meal is coming from.

My wife and I try to volunteer a few times per year.  We try to not tell anyone about it.  We Just simply show up at the food kitchen on a Saturday morning and volunteer for a few hours.  Nobody needs to know how wonderful we are.  I feel that if I talk about it, it becomes more about me than about the act of giving back.  That just reduces the degree of happiness that I find in this type of volunteering.

If you are intimidated by the thought of helping the homeless, don’t get discouraged.  There are many ways to volunteer.  It does not have to be a formal process.  Take a ride to your nearest park and bring a trash bag and gardening gloves with you.  Spend one-hour walking around the park and picking up litter.

I have found that many people in the financial independence community have discovered the joy of helping others.  A good example of this occurs at the Chautauqua Financial Independence Conference.  I have read that it is common for a day of community service to be added to these events to go along with the lectures and discussions about financial independence.

Conclusion

Can money buy happiness? I honestly don’t know for sure.  The research shows that it can up to a point for some people.  For others, it seems like happiness is based on having more.  I also don’t know if people should be basing their happiness on how much money they have.  I have found that having money is better than not having money if the rest of your life is in order.  If you have enough of it, you have more options as to how you choose to live.  That will afford you the ability to focus your time and energy on what you are passionate about.  If the concept of being free makes you happy, money is a means to that end.

 

Joining a Board of Directors

Have you ever thought about joining a board of directors for an organization that you are interested in serving?  I recently was invited to join the board of directors for a local non-profit organization.  It was flattering to be invited.  Of course, I jumped at this opportunity to be of service.

My wife has always been involved in community and church service.  Slowly, her good nature has rubbed off on me.  Over the past few years, I have volunteered to help the clients at the local chapter of The ARC to prepare for job interviews.  It is such a rewarding experience.  When I finish with a lesion, I feel that I receive back more in gratitude than they receive in development.

By joining this board, I see it as an opportunity to give back more to the community.  The board that I joined is for The Mature Workers Program that is part of the National Council on Aging.  It was a good fit for me since I work in HR for a not-for-profit healthcare organization.

There are many benefits of joining a board of directors:

Career

Joining a board of directors is a smart move for your career.  It looks great on your LinkedIn profile.  It shows that you are service orientated.  By being on a board of directors, it reflects that you are a well-respected individual by people of influence.  It shows that you see the big picture.  When a potential employer sees that you volunteer as an advisor, they interrupt it as that you want to contribute to something that is bigger than yourself.  Those are all great characteristics that might not normally stand out on a standard chronological resume.

People of Influence

Many boards attract people of influence.  It is common for boards to be made up of lawyers, executives, community leaders, business owners, and other financially independent people who are passionate about an organization or cause.  It is an opportunity to meet and interact with these folks.  It is a chance to partner with them and work to improve the organization that you now help to oversee.  It is a networking opportunity that is not readily available to everyone.  By closely interacting with these individuals, there is the potential to develop close relationships with them because you share a common bond.  Work to foster those relationships.  You never know how or when those connections can be helpful in the future.

Community Pride

Do you care about the area where you live, an organization, or a cause?  By joining a board of directors, you are able to have input.  Today, everyone has an opinion, but by being on a board of directors, you have an option that matters.  It is an opportunity to become a community leader and to develop an abundance mindset.  Even if it is on a small level, it is still a trusted role.  It is a position where people care what you have to say.  Everyone might not agree with you, but you still have a voice and a vote when it comes to the management of the organization that you serve.  It is truly a position of respect.

Leadership Skills

Being on a board of directors will help to develop you into a leader.  You will have to review and approve of budgets.  You will have input when it comes to shaping policy.  You will be presented with the goals of the organization and how management is working to reach these goals.  As the member of a board of directors, you are responsible to lead and to present input that shapes the best practices of the organization.  Your negotiation skills will be sharpened.  You will learn true team building skills as you work with other board members to shape the future direction of the organization.

How to Join

In most cases, you must be invited or elected to join a board of directors.  There are organizations, however, that are looking for people to join.  First, do research on organizations that you are interested in.  Try to identify organizations that have a mission, vision, and values that you feel strongly about.  Do some deeper digging and find out if you have any connections to the organization.  Use LinkedIn to identify possible connections.  Share your interest in the organization and look for ways to volunteer.  After you learn if the organization is a fit, make a formal request to join the board or to be nominated if the selection is based on an election.

Conclusion

The organization that I am now on the board of directors for wants to increase the number of clients that they serve.  They have an adequate marketing budget.  They run television ads, radio ads, and attend most community events where people over the age of 55 might attend.

At my first meeting, I suggested that they allocate some of the marketing money towards social media and brought up the idea of creating a blog.  The suggestion went over well.  It is going to be added as a topic for debate and to be voted upon at a future board meeting.

I have truly enjoyed my short experience serving as a board member.  It feels good to be able to give back.  It has been a privilege to volunteer my time.  I am looking forward to future board meetings and for the opportunity to be of service.

Have you ever served on a board of directors?

If yes, please share your experience.

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