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Financial Planning for New College Graduates

You did it.  You earned your college degree.  Congratulations on this major life accomplishment.

Hopefully, you have a job lined-up in your field of study.  If not, don’t get overwhelmed.  Start applying and interviewing.   Before you know it, you will be working, growing your career, and earning a paycheck.

The good times are not over, but it is time to enter the real world.  By starting this next chapter of your life on the right track, you will be able to better ensure a sound financial future.  Right now, time is on your side.

As a new college graduate, I am sure the last thing on your mind is retirement.  Retirement might be many decades away, but the actions you take in the coming years will shape your financial future.  Below are the key steps that will help you to establish a plan that will guild you on your journey toward financial independence.

Step 1 – Save 15% of your salary.  Start this process of saving with your first paycheck.  It might sound like a high percentage, but this is just the first step.

Step 2 – Sign up for your employer’s retirement savings plan.  If you work in the for-profit universe, it is called know as a 401K.  If you work at a not-for-profit organization, it is called a 403B.  If you work for the Federal Government, it is a Thrift Savings Plan (TSP).  On your first day of work, go to the Human Resources office and sign up to contribute 15% of your salary to their retirement savings plan.  Increase the amount that you contribute to your retirement plan by 1% every year.

Step 3 – If possible, only Invest using low-cost mutual funds and index funds.  Avoid trying to pick individual stocks or trying to time the market.  Identify an asset allocation that best matches your age and risk tolerance.  Historically stocks have produced higher returns than bonds. Stocks, however, are more volatile.  On the other hand, bonds are less volatile but do not keep up well with inflation.  Establish a plan that uses both stocks for growing your wealth and bonds to retain your wealth during bad economic times.

Step 4 – Establish a plan to pay off your student loan debt.  Don’t fall victim to the mindset of the masses when it comes to student loans.  You attended college and earned a degree.  Hopefully, you paid attention in class and are ready to put your degree to work for you as an employee.  You attended class, possibly lived in a dorm, and most likely ate your meals in the cafeteria.  It is time to pay back what you owe.  Avoid self-pity and feelings of entitlement.  Those ill feelings will just hold you back on many levels.

Step 5 – Get a part-time job.  For those who have the entrepreneurial spirit, start a side business.  You are young and full of energy.  Now is the time for you to be working and building a solid financial foundation.  Getting a part-time job will allow you to earn extra money.  Working a couple of evenings during the week and picking up some hours on the weekend will greatly help to increase your earnings. That extra money can be used to pay off your student loans, establish an emergency fund, or open a Roth IRA.

Step 6 – Put off attending graduate school.  Unless you work in an industry that requires a graduate degree to obtain entry-level employment, put off attending for a couple of years.  Find an employer who offers tuition assistance as part of their compensation package.  That will allow you to work in the day and take graduate classes in the evening or on the weekend.

Step 7 – Write a financial plan.  A financial plan is a map.  It allows you to identify where you are at from a financial standpoint.  A financial plan is also a map that can be used as a guide to where you want to be in the future.  It helps to have a guide than to go it alone.  Financial planning is too important of a topic to not have a plan and just fly by the seat of your pants.  A financial plan is a living document that needs to be reviewed annually.  The great feature of a financial plan is that it can be amended as your plans and goals change.

Step 8 – Establish a budget.  Calculate how much you will earn every month from your job.  Write out your budget based on percentages.  Know how much of your salary will go towards housing, food, entertainment, and every other expense.  Be sure to write a budget that is practical in terms of expenses and prudent in terms of savings. In other words, always try to reduce expenses and to increase savings.

Step 9 – Keep your transportation costs low.  Transportation costs are simply an expense in your budget.  Use your budget as a guide to determine how much you can afford to spend on a car.  Keep your transportation costs at 11% of your budget.  Your budget will determine if you can afford a fancy new car or a used economy model.  Try to keep in mind that a car does not determine your identity.  It is just what enables you to travel from Point A to Point B in a timely manner.

Step 10 – Keep your housing costs as low as possible.  If you are renting, try to find a roommate or two.  Having a few roommates greatly reduces the amount you will have to pay for rent every month.  As you advance in your career and if you have a family, you might consider buying a house.  Use your budget as a guide to determine how much house you can afford.

Step 11 – Be sure that you are properly insured.  If you are under the age of 26, you should be able to remain on your parent’s health insurance.  If not, ask your employer about when you are eligible for coverage under their plan.  You are young and most likely healthy, but one trip to the emergency room could ruin you financially if you do not have proper health insurance.  Also, be sure that you have the proper amount of insurance for your car, home or apartment, and life insurance if you have a spouse or children.

Step 12 – Avoid Debt. Keep your debt to a minimum.  Avoid payday loans and credit card debt at all costs.  Having a high credit score is important because it will allow you to get the most favorable interest rates if you do have to borrow money.  To ensure you do not take on too much debt, monitor your debt with the Debt-To-Income Ratio.  Always try to keep your DTI under 16% and never exceed 36%.  In life, sometimes debt is unavoidable.  Most people will have to take out a mortgage to purchase a house.  Some people will have to take out a car loan in order to have a means of transportation.  When doing so, use both your budget and DTI to determine how much you can safely afford.

Conclusion

There you have it.  You are finished with college and ready to take on the world.  Don’t put off applying these steps.  You can start implementing some of these steps on your first day of employment.  If you start out with a well-established plan, you will be well ahead of your peers.  Use these steps as a guide and you will surely become a financial success story.

Do you agree with these suggestions?  Do you think that anything is missing from this plan?  What would you add or do differently?

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