Tag Archives: Saving Money

Financial Unmanageability Transcends Money

When it comes to finding ways to better manage your finances, there are unlimited resources.  There are many great books, blogs, forums, websites, and apps.  There is not a shortage of information, tools, or even professional services.  If a person wants to make improvements when it comes to spending less, paying down debt, saving more of their earnings, or learning to invest, they could find out how to do it in a matter of minutes by doing a few simple online searches.

If the solution to finding ways to improve your financial situation is so readily available, why are so many people struggling?  Yes, we can blame the marketers for always trying to sell the newest gadget.  That excuse, however, only carries so much weight.  Consumers are more educated than ever and many tune ads out.

What if the problem is more pervasive?  What if the problem is beyond simple behavior modification? What if the problem is based on unmanageability?  Yes, the inability to have mastery over your life.

If the problem is based in unmanageability, there is not a blog or app to solve the problem.  If your life is truly unmanageable, trying to get a better handle on your financial shortcomings is just treating a symptom.  To gain control of your life, it will take a little more than spending less and saving more.

Denial

Nobody truly wants to admit their life is unmanageable.  Just like nobody wants to admit they drink, spend, eat, or gamble too much.  It is natural for many people to think, I don’t have an issue with my finances and then go spend more money.  It is common behavior for people who have addiction problems or a spiritual malady to deny what the problem is.  The thought process is like a broken record that skips the same verse over and over.  I do not have a problem with my finances – go spend more money.

Resentment

To resent is to keep going back to a negative feeling.  Instead of feeling and processing those bad or negative feelings, you spend money.  Resentment is not always based on harboring ill feeling towards someone who you believe wronged you in some way.  Resentment can also be rooted in harboring ill feelings towards someone who did exactly what you expected them to do.  The problem was that you were still not satisfied.  They were unable to fill that void that exists within you.  To find temporary relief, you continue to spend and try to fill that void with an external fix.  Unfortunately, it does not last.  After you exhale out and feel relief, you almost immediately inhale the resentment back in.

It is All About You

When you live an unmanageable life, there will always be a conflict with self.  It is all about you.  You cannot be of real use to others.  Sure, you might be physically present in their life, but are you truly living in the moment?  Or are you just physically there, but mentally bound to your troubles?  When your self-centered thoughts and feelings are the focus of your existence, it is difficult to make meaningful connections with others.

Anxiety 

You are not a bad person.  You might even do nice things for others.  You believe that you are thoughtful and caring.  You spend money on the people you care about and on those who you want to care about you. Externally that all might be true, but aren’t you just doing all those things to find more relief and to feel better about your current state of unmanageability?

Do you live in fear?  Do you spend more than you earn and panic when the bills arrive?  Do you lay awake at night and worry that you will never be able to get out from under all the debt you are in?  Do you see retirement as a possible option for others, but something that you would never be able to afford?  Do you obsess over your finances in one thought, but follow it up with more spending that pushes you further away from having healthy finances?  Do you feel hopeless?

Is this fear leading to other health concerns?  Is it leading to weight gain or panic attacks?  Have you gone to see your doctor because you feel overwhelmed?  Did your doctor put you on meds to take the edge off and to help you cope?

There is a Solution

Yes, getting your finances in order is great, but you first need to get your mind right.  I am not a therapist.  I am just a guy with a personal finance blog.  If you are honesty suffering from the symptoms that I listed above, you should seek outside help.  Find out if your health insurance covers visits to a psychologist without a referral from your primary care doctor.  If not, ask your doctor for a referral to one that they recommend.  You might have to pay a low co-pay, but it will be worth it.

There are also 12-step programs.  As I stated earlier, your spending might be just a symptom of a larger issue.  There are 12-step programs for spending, gambling, drinking, and just about any other type of obsessive disease.  It is up to you to dig deeper and decide if you think a 12-step solution would be a good fit for you.

Conclusion

Don’t beat yourself up.  Don’t wallow in guilt, shame, remorse, or any other negative feeling.  The past is the past.  It is time to move on.  Pick up the pieces.  You are not a bad person.  You might have made poor decisions and you might suffer from the disease of addiction.  After you put your own house back in order, you can make amends to those you feel you might have harmed including yourself.

There is hope.  There is also help available.  It is now up to you to find the right help that will be a catalyst for positive change.

Once you get your mind right, great things will start to happen in your life.  Not only will your financial situation improve, but every area of your life will get better.  How could it not, you will be moving away from the problem and in the solution.

You will be able to better accept people and situations as they are.  You will be able to let go of the past. You will better assimilate into the mainstream of life.  You will become more useful to the people around you.  You will finally find the peace that you have been searching for all along.

As a bonus, you should be able to better budget and save money.  Your whole life will become more manageable.  Having a few more bucks in the bank will just make life more enjoyable.

This post might contain affiliate links.

Please be sure to read the Disclaimer page.

Early Retirement: Removing Barriers

Many people dream of reaching early retirement.  Few people, however, are willing to do what it takes to make it a reality.  In most cases, to reach early retirement, a person must live differently from how the masses live.  People generally don’t want to be viewed as being different from their fellows.

The masses are living for the day, spending most of what they earn, landing in debt, and are in denial about their personal finances.  They have high hopes that their financial future will be secure.  Hope, however, is not a strategy.

To reach early retirement, a strategy is needed.  That strategy will require action and more action.  The primary objective of that strategy will be to first reach financial independence.  Financial independence is what enables people to retire early.  If a person is no longer working, the money to sustain their lifestyle needs to come from somewhere.  For most early retirees, that somewhere is their passive investments.

The path to being able to retire early is full of barriers.  Many are external like being able to maintain a budget while marketers are doing everything they can to get you to break your budget and buy whatever it is they are selling.  Some barriers are mental.  The purpose of this post is to identify a few of these barriers and to establish a plan of action to avoid them.

Ignorance

Most people are unaware of what is required when it comes to planning for an early retirement.  That is even true for those who have attended college.  People who hold a 4-year degree or beyond still struggle with doing what is required to escape having to work for a living.

When it comes to establishing a financial plan, many people truly do not understand what is required.  They feel that things will just work out like they have in other areas of their life like landing a good job or getting a mortgage to buy a house.  They are generally in denial about what is required to build a large enough net worth to sustain their desired lifestyle once they are no longer working.

The good news is that once a person decides to learn more about personal finance, there is an abundance of great information.  Once a person takes that first step towards learning about budgeting, saving, and investing, they have removed one barrier.  Once that barrier has been removed, they will discover that the basics can carry a person a long way.  The basics alone might be enough to carry some people to financial independence.

Procrastinating

Procrastinating is another barrier that stands in the way of reaching early retirement.  Not knowing about a topic is one thing.  Knowing and not doing anything is another.  To reach early retirement, it takes many years of earning a salary, saving a large percentage of that income, and investing it wisely.

The longer a person waits to start this process, the harder it becomes.  That is based on compound interest.  Let’s assume that an investor needs to have $1,000,000 saved to declare financial independence.  They also want to reach this milestone by age 50.

Based on an 8% percent return, if an investor starts to save $1,800 per month at age 30, it will take 20 years to reach their goal.   If they wait until age 40 to start saving, they will have to save almost $6,000 per month.  If they started at age 22, however, they would only have to save $900 per month.

When you are young, time is on your side.  The older you get, the harder it becomes.  Don’t procrastinate if your goal is to reach early retirement.

Not investing in stocks

To receive a return close to 8%, an investor will need to have a large percentage of stocks in their asset allocation.  Based on how investments are projected to perform for the next 10 years, an 8% return might not be reasonable.  Large-cap stocks are projected to earn 6.7% threw 2026.  For that same period, investment grade bonds are projected to earn 3.1%.

The average person has the tendency to shy away from stocks.  In the short-term, they are volatile.  Over long periods of time, they are one of the best wealth building investments for individual investors.

Instead of parking your money in a money market that returns 1%, consider adding stocks to your asset allocation.  A good place to start is to look at a balanced portfolio of 60% stocks and 40% in bonds.  This allocation is popular because it provides growth from the stock allocation and the bond allocation reduces volatility when the stock market has a correction.  Another general rule of thumb is to invest (110 minus your age in stocks).  If you are age 25, you might want to consider having around 85% of your asset allocation in stocks.

Lifestyle Creep

Lifestyle creep is a form of inflation.   As a person advances in their career and their earnings increase, it is natural for their spending to increase.  As raises and promotions pile up, people have the tendency to upgrade their lifestyle.  Instead of saving more of their earnings, people buy bigger houses, fancier cars, and go on expensive vacations.

If there is lifestyle creep in your life, it is a major barrier between reaching early retirement and being stuck as a wage earner.  Lifestyle creep inflates how much money you need in your retirement account before you can retire.  In contrast, if you keep your monthly expenses low, the less you will need to be able to retire.

If you plan on withdrawing 4% from your retirement account, have $100,000 in annual expenses, you will need $2,500,000 in retirement savings.  For those who only have $40,000 in annual expenses, they just need to save $1,000,000.  The higher your annual expenses are, the more you need to have in retirement savings.

To avoid lifestyle creep, some management is required.  A solid budget is needed.  A financial plan is also a vital tool.  First, focus on the big expenses.  Keep your housing, transportation, taxes, and education costs low.  For example, live in your starter house forever, buy an economical car, live in an area that does not have high taxes, and take advantage of public schools and state universities.

If you can avoid lifestyle creep on the major expenses, you will have more money for savings.  This will also lead to less financial stress.  Instead of stressing to cover your bills that are always increasing, you will be able to better enjoy your life because there will be less demand for having to earn more and more.

Conclusion

For most people, the road to early retirement takes a long time.  It generally takes a couple decades of solid earnings, a high savings rate, and compound interest.  To achieve this ambitus goal, there are barriers that need to be identified and managed.

To be successful with personal finance, education is required.  The great news is that there is an abundance of good books, blogs, and forums that provide unlimited information.  A good place to start is the Resources page on this blog.

There is no such thing as an overnight success.  Most overnight success stories have been a fifteen-year work in progress.  If you want to be financially successful and retire early, start today.  It is not an overnight endeavor.

Without some risk, there will only be a little return.  Identify the correct mix of stocks and bonds for your situation.  Be sure to take your age and risk tolerance into consideration.

Manage your expenses.  The greater your expenses, the more money you must save and grow.  By keeping your expenses low, the less money you will need in retirement.

There will always be barriers that stand in the way of reaching early retirement.  Once they are identified, they can be managed and overcome.  Keep your eyes open for other barriers that might pop-up.  Be vigilant and stay focused and you will be sure to reach financial independence and retire early.

This post might contain affiliate links.

Please be sure to read the Disclaimer page.

Saving: The Foundation for Financial Success

Is your goal to reach financial independence?  Do you want to retire early?  If you have an ambitious financial goal, there are many things that you must do correctly.  For example, you need to always be working on improving your ability to earn more money.  You must live below your means.  You must invest wisely in stocks and bonds.  It is also important to take advantage of tax-deferred accounts like a 401K or IRA.  Yes, all those steps are important, but in my experience, having a high savings rate is the most important step to becoming financially successful.

I see savings as the foundation for being financially successful.  Without savings, there is no money to invest.  It is the foundation for one’s financial house to be built upon.  For a house to last, it needs a solid foundation.  If you skimp on the sand or mortar, the foundation will not be suitable to support the structure that you are dreaming about constructing.  If you are not saving enough money, you will not have enough to support a high quality of life when you retire and draw from your savings to pay your expenses.

Savings Rate

This will probably not come as a big surprise, but American’s are not saving enough.  The current national savings rate is just over 5%.  As recent as the 1980’s, the saving rate in the United States was over 10%.  If your goal is reaching financial independence and ultimately early retirement, a savings rate of 5% is not enough.  Even with compound interest, it would simply take too long to grow into a substantial enough nest egg to cover your living expenses.

How Much is Enough

In the classic personal finance book The Richest Man in Babylon, a savings rate of 10% is suggested.  I feel 10% is the bare minimum that the average American should be saving.  I do not think that is nearly enough if your goal is early retirement.  It might be suitable if your goal is to reach financial independence by age 65, but not if you want to retire at age 50.

If you are just entering the workforce, start by saving 15% of your salary.  Work on increasing that rate every year.  Try to increase it by at least 1% annually.  Increase it with every annual raise or bonus.

Spending

Spending is the opposite of savings.  Spending is the enemy of wealth creation.  Spending leads to lifestyle creep.  The more stuff you buy, the more stuff you will want.  There is always something new or better than what you own.

Marketers earn a living by trying to convince you to buy what they are selling.  When you see that your friends or neighbors have the newest products, you will want to upgrade your stuff too.  This is a vicious cycle without an end.

The secret to winning this game is to not play.  Every dollar that you spend puts you one dollar further away from financial independence.  On the other hand, every dollar you save goes towards buying your freedom.

Debt

Debt is created when you spend more than you earn.  Some debt is not as bad as other debt.  Student loans provide you with the funds to get an education to obtain the skills to earn a higher salary.  Taking out a mortgage enables most Americans to be homeowners.  You still must use extreme caution before you incur any type of debt.

Bad debt comes in the form of credit cards, auto loans, and payday loans.  All debt, however, prevents you from saving as much as you could be saving.  When you take on excessive debt, you become a slave to your creditor.  It is possible, but difficult to escape from the bondage of debt once you start to slide down that slippery slope.

Why Save So Much

Once you take on the mindset of a saver, you will never be a spender.  Personal Capital is a free online platform that is great for tracking savings.  That feeling of accomplishment of watching your savings grow is far greater than any new product that you can buy.

After you become a saver, you might notice a mental twist occur.  Once you reach a point in life when you could afford luxury cars and upgrade to a larger house, you will realize that you do not want to waste your money on any of that stuff.  Buying new stuff will become unimportant.  You will see it as being wasteful.

At that point, spending is viewed as an opportunity cost.  You will want your money to keep growing.  Financial independence will become the most import thing that your money can buy.  There is no product or service that is more appealing than having mastery over your own life.

As a saver, you will always be trying to optimize your spending and to live on less.  It is fun to try to stretch a dollar as far as it can be stretched. This mindset will greatly help you on your journey toward financial independence because you will need less money to live on.

For example, if you can live on $40,000 per year, you only need to have $1,000,000 saved based on a 4% withdrawal rate.  What about if you want to live on $100,000 per year?  You would have to have $2,500,000 in savings at a 4% withdrawal rate.  The more money you require, the further away you are from freedom.

Compound Interest

Compound interest works no matter what your saving rate is.  It is just math.  It just works better if you have a high savings rate.  For example, Joe saves $800 per month and Bill saves $2,000 per month.  Their savings both grew by 8%.

How much will Joe have in savings after ten years?  He will have over $147,000 saved.  That is a nice sized nest egg.  It is a solid foundation to build upon.  However, he is still a long way from financial independence.

How much will Bill have saved?  Bill will have over $368,000 in savings.  Bill is well on his way to reaching financial independence.  He is starting to see the light at the end of the tunnel.

As you can see, compound interest worked out well for both Joe and Bill.  Joe has a nice financial foundation.  Bill, on the other hand, has almost 10 years of living expenses stashed away assuming he can live on $40,000 per year.

Conclusion

Start saving early.  Save as much as you can.  Always try to save more.  Don’t be fooled into thinking that you are missing out on anything because you are saving too much.  Once you become a saver, you will have established the required foundation that is needed to fuel the wealth building process.

This post might contain affiliate links.  Please be sure to read the Disclaimer page.

How I learned about money

I learned about money from my Grandmother.  I was a precocious kid.  As an only child, I spent a great amount of time with adults.  The adults in my life had the tendency to try to have a dialog with me as if I too were an adult.  Friends from school would come over to my house to play quite often, but I remember spending a great amount of time with my Grandmother.

My Grandmother owned her own small business.  She was a seamstress.  She worked for a few different bridal shops.  She also worked for a men’s clothing store.  Most days, she would pick me up after school and take me to her shop.  She would watch me until my Mother would pick me up on her way home from work.

It did not take me long to catch on to the theory of commerce.  Her customers would drop off clothes to be altered.  She would make the alterations with her sewing machine.  The customers would pick up their clothes and pay her.  When I earned good grades, she would take me to KB Toys and buy me Star Wars action figures.  Even though I was only 5 or 6, I understood this process.

There were also times when I would ask her to buy me a toy and she would say that she could not afford it.  She would explain that business was slow and she did not earn much money that week.  She said that she only had money for food, gas for her car, and other needs.  She taught me at a young age that if you want money, you must work to earn it.

That was a complex theory to comprehend at such a young age.  I was only in first grade.  I do not have a psychology degree.   I can, however, see that my frugal ways and entrepreneurial spirit were shaped by her teaching me how the business worked.

The second lesson that she taught me was equally as profound.  She and I would sit together in her shop.  I would do my school work and she would be sewing.  I would spend about one hour per day with her.  We would have conversations.  She would ask what I learned at school that day?  She would tell me about her work and other stories.  She would talk about her life when she was growing up, her church, and money.

Money was her favorite topic.  She once told me that she invested in CDs that had paid out an interest rate of 13%.  She would double her money in 6 years.  She was so excited.  I am now referring to the early 1980’s when inflation and interest rates were sky high.  She explained that she would let the bank borrow $1000 from her and in 6 years they would give her $2000 back.  I found that fascinating.  Now, remember, I did not understand compound interest.  I was not introduced to multiplication yet.

This first blog post is a tribute to my Grandmother.  Looking back, she truly shaped my view of money.  If you want money, you must work for it.  Also, if you have money, you should invest it.

In case you might be interested, my Grandmother is still alive.  My parents take care of her now.  She is 94 and ran her business until she was in her 80s.  She had to finally give it up because her body was breaking down.  Sewing was her passion.  At the end of her career, she was just doing alternations for her neighbors.  I don’t think she even charged them.  She just liked them coming over to talk with her.

Occasionally, my Grandmother will call my wife and ask her to come over for a visit.  She wants to teach her how to use her sewing machine and pass on her legacy.  Maybe she will also share some investing tips with her too.  We have never consistently earned 13% returns on our portfolio.

How did you learn about money?

Sirius XM: Getting Past No

Yesterday, when I was checking the mail to see what type of junk the postman delivered, I noticed a letter from Sirius XM Radio.  When I opened the letter, it was for my subscription renewal.  I have the Sirius XM All Access Plan.  The total that I owed was $273.  That was for the base price of $239 and $34 for a music royalty fee.

Wait, I know what you are thinking.  This guy has a blog about personal finance and financial Independence (FI), but he pays to listen to the radio in his car.  Many people are trying to find ways to reduce expenses like cutting the cable cord at home to eliminate a monthly bill?  Paying to listen to the radio in your car is just a waste of money when you can listen to the terrestrial radio for free.

Yes, those are all valid points.  Before you judge me, please let me explain my situation.  My job requires that I travel in my car often.  I spend many hours in my car each week.  My journeys take me to Northern New Jersey, rural Pennsylvania, and the Southern Tier of New York.  Except for New Jersey, the traffic is not bad, but the driving is boring and the radio channels are terrible.  Having Sirius XM makes my traveling much more enjoyable.

Even though having Sirius XM adds pleasure to my weekly trips, I was not willing to pay $273 for the yearly subscription.  I knew that I did not spend that much the previous year, so I went and looked up my credit card statement from last summer.  It was only $136 after taxes and fees.

As of late, I have been reading many articles on different finance blogs about trying to reduce monthly bills.  Many authors simply suggest calling and asking for a price reduction.  I decided to give that a try because I do not want to have to shell out $273 to listen to Sirius XM.

When I called, I spoke with a Customer Service Representative named Daniel.  I told Daniel that I enjoy listening to Sirius XM.  The new price, however, was too expensive.  I asked if he could lower it.

Daniel informed me that Sirius XM had a new price structure.  He first offered me the price that I paid last year but said that it did not come with the two Howard Stern channels or the NFL channel.  That offer was unacceptable because I enjoy those channels.

His second offer was a price of $199 for my current plan.  I told him that I like the programming that Sirius XM offers.  It makes my drive to work more pleasurable.  Never the less, it was just too expensive.

I asked him if I could have the same total price of $136 that I paid last year.  Sirius-XM must get many calls from customers who want to lower their bill.  They also seem to invest in some negotiation training.  Daniel asked what I would do if I could not have that price.  His response reminded me of the books Getting Past No and Getting to Yes by William Ury.  He was searching for my (BANTA) or best alternative to a negotiated agreement.  That is a theory made popular William Ury created as part of the Harvard Negotiation Project.

Getting Past NO, William Ury

Getting To Yes, William Ury

Even though I was impressed with his negotiation skills, I told him that I would not be able to afford the new price.  It was too expensive.  If I did not receive the price that I paid last year, I would have to cancel my subscription.

He was hesitant at first and said that my new price was almost half of what the new price was.  After he thought about it for a few seconds, he agreed to the total price of $136 after taxes and fees.  He did not want to lose me as a customer.

If this approach works with Sirius XM, what other bills can I call about and try to reduce?  I am now motivated to find out.  It was worth the little bit of effort to make the phone call.  The worst they can say is that they cannot reduce the bill.

The customer truly has the power during these negotiations.  The customer has the power to say no.  The customer has the freedom to simply walk away and take their business elsewhere.

Do you have any experiences of calling a company to have a bill reduced?