Tag Archives: Chase 5/24 Rule

Travel Hacking: Round Three

This post is the third post in my new series on Travel Hacking.  In Travel Hacking: Round Two, I was expecting the third round to be about using the Chase Southwest Rapid Rewards Card.  Life happened and I had to amend those plans.

The change in plans was due to an unexpected expense that recently occurred.  When you own a house, unexpected bills occur.  When you own an older house, they tend to pop up more frequently because things get old, wear out, and break.

These unexpected repairs always seem to occur at inopportune times.  Our most recent major repair came when we returned from vacation.  We came home and noticed that we did not have hot water.

The lack of hot water was due to our oil furnace not working.  It was installed in 1992 and I knew it was on its last leg.  Over the years, I replaced valves that wore out, but I was aware that the boiler was getting old and that I was going to have to buy a new furnace soon.

The benefit of having an emergency fund is to cover unexpected expenses.  Some people debate that, but I am not one to split hairs about when an emergency fund should be used.  In my opinion, if your house does not have heat or hot water, that is an emergency. 

The cost to replace my furnace was $6,300.  Talk about tossing six grand out the window.  The benefit of my new furnace is that it is more efficient.  I swapped out a 150 BTU furnace for a smaller 118 BTU furnace.  I live in a rural area, so switching to a lower cost heating option like natural gas is not available. 

The cash for the repair was sitting in the bank.  There was not any panic about this repair.  I just did not want to spend that much money without being rewarded. 

The next set of credit cards that I was planning on using were the Chase Southwest Rapid Rewards Card and the Southwest Rapid Rewards Premier Business Credit Card.  Those two cards are set-up for all of my household bills.  It is forecasted that I will have enough points to earn the sought-after companion pass soon.

Since I had this large unexpected bill, I wanted to pay for it on a premium credit card.  This single purchase was large enough to cover more than the required three month’s worth of spending to qualify for bonus points on a top card.  Most of these premium cards reward bonus points are earned when a new cardholder spends $5,000 in three months.  I was more than covered.

Another aspect that I had to consider was that I am following a plan similar to the Chase Gauntlet that was made popular by the guys over at the ChooseFI Podcast.  As part of the Chase Gauntlet, the Chase 5/24 rule is a major aspect.  The Chase 5/24 rule restricts people from opening fewer than 5 credit cards in the past 24 months.

The way that I was able to open another card that did not apply to the Chase 5/24 rule was to open a business card.  I was able to open a business card because of this blog.  It was created as a business.

The business card that I decided to open was the American Express Business Gold Card.  This card had a $0 introductory annual fee for the first year and then $175 per year after that.  The welcome offer was 50,000 points with $5,000 of qualifying spend in 3-months (I had more than that with one purchase).

The American Express Business Gold Card had impressive featured benefits.  Cardholders have many options to earn 3X points.  3X points can be earned when flights are purchased directly from airlines, on advertising with select media, at U.S. gas stations, U.S. purchases for shipping, and other business expenses including U.S. computer-based purchases from specific providers. 1X points are earned on every other purchase.

Premium Roadside Assistance is a great benefit for cardholders.  I will not have to renew my AAA membership this year ($100 in my pocket).  The American Express Business Gold Card offers roadside assistance in case of a breakdown or flat time.  They will pay for emergency services up to four times per year.  They will even come to your home if it is for a jumpstart or flat time.

This card includes some nice travel benefits.  It includes car rental and damage insurance.  You can receive baggage insurance.  Travel insurance is a benefit.  There is also a Global Assist Hotline that provides medical, legal, financial, and other emergency assistance services when a cardholder travels more than 100 miles from home.

The American Express Business Gold Card offers shopping benefits.  Cardholders can shop with confidence when they use this credit card.  Some benefits shoppers receive are extended warranties on eligible purchases, purchase protection, return protection, and entertainment access for presale tickets.

While all of those benefits are nice, the main reason that I signed up for the card was to earn points.  How much are those 50,000 points worth?  According to the Points Guy, they are worth about $950 in travel rewards.  Those points will come in handy when it is time to book next year’s vacation. 

As a personal finance blogger, I enjoy saving money and building wealth more than spending money.  When I do spend money, I like to do so on things that I enjoy.  While I do enjoy hot showers and a warm house in winter, buying a furnace is not an enjoyable purchase.  Being able to score over $900 in points reduced the pain of having to replace my furnace.

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Travel Hacking: Round Two

Travel hacking is a great way to travel for free.  Travel Hacking is the practice of opening premium rewards credit cards to capture the generous initial bonus points that these credit cards offer to new cardholders.  The hack is based on getting the bonus points, closing the card before the annual fee is due, and never paying interest or carrying a monthly balance.

I first learned about travel hacking from reading The Millionaire Educator.  It sounded interesting.  It was not until I attended a Rockstar Finance Meet-Up in New York City that I really got turned on to this practice of traveling for free.

In my post Travel Hacking: Round One, I wrote about my first experience with Travel Hacking.  The first card that my wife and I opened was the Chase Sapphire Preferred Card.  We used the bonus points from this card to buy two round-trip tickets from Newark, NJ to Dublin, Ireland.

As the result of my first experience, I have decided that travel hacking will be a major part of my financial plan.  My wife and I take at least two vacations per year.  Even though I am frugal, we still have the monthly household spending to earn enough points to pay for two trips per year.

The second card that I opened was the Chase Preferred Ink Business Card.  Unlike the Chase Sapphire, the Chase Preferred Ink Business Card is a business card.  In order to qualify, having a small business like a blog or an Etsy store would qualify.  For sole proprietors who do not have a tax id, they could use their Social Security number when signing up for business credit cards.

Another benefit that the Chase Preferred Ink Business Card offers is that it does not count against the  Chase 5/24 rule that Chase has for opening new cards.  Chase only allows individuals to open 5 cards in a 24 month period from any issuing bank, you will not be approved for new Chase credit card.  That also applies for anyone who is an authorized user.  Since it is a business card, it is not counted as being part of the 5/24 rule.

The Chase Preferred Ink Business card offers a very rich benefits program.  After the cardholder spends $5,000 in 3 months, they receive 80,000 bonus points.  When you redeem those points through Chase Ultimate Rewards, 80,000 points are equal to about $1,000 towards travel.

When you open the Chase Preferred Ink Business Card, there is a $95 annual fee.  Unlike the Chase Sapphire Preferred card, that fee is not waved for the first year.  Based on the value of those 80,000 travel points, it is easy to justify the $95 for one year.

On additional spend, cardholders earn 3 points for every $1 in spending.  The 3 points for every $1 in money spent is good for up to the first $150,000 charged.  After that, cardholders earn 1 point for every $1 in spending.

My wife and I used this card for all of our monthly expenses.  We try to put all of our monthly reoccurring bills on the card.  We also use it when we go out to eat at a restaurant or fill up our car at the gas station.  It took us two months to reach the $5,000 in spend to equal the 80,000 points.

So, how did we use these points?  My wife’s birthday is in December.  She does not know it, but I booked a Western Caribbean Cruise.  While going on a cruise is exciting by itself, this cruise departs on December 23rd.  What makes that exciting is that winter is in full swing in Pennsylvania at that point, so we will even appreciate the cruise more.

I wish that I was able to report that I was able to book the cruise for free.  Unfortunately, that was not the case.  Hopefully, I will be able to share a post about taking a free cruise with you in the future.  I have not reached that level of travel hacking success yet.

What I did apply the points towards was our flight.  I have never booked a flight from Pennsylvania to Florida in December.  When I went to book this trip, I was shocked to find out how inflated the prices are this time of year.  After giving it a little bit of thought, it makes sense due to the holiday traffic and snowbirds who are flying south for winter.

The normal cost for a ticket from the Scranton International Airport to Tampa is around $300.  This flight cost $625 per person.  Our flight to Ireland was less expensive.

The total amount of points that were required to cover our two tickets were 112,000 in Chase Points.  At this point, I had 88,000 in chase points from the Chase Preferred Ink Business Card.  My wife and I also had 30,000 in points from our spending on the Chase Sapphire Preferred Card.  By combining the points from the two cards we were able to cover the airfare.

With the remainder of our points, we booked our hotel.  The cruise departs on Sunday, December 23.  We are flying down the day before.  I was surprised, but we were able to pay for one night at a 3-star hotel for only 6,000 points.  That was the only value that I have found so far on this trip.

Even though the flight was expensive, it ended up being free for us since we took advantage of our points from the Chase Preferred Ink Business Card.  Otherwise, we would have had to shell out over $1,200 for a 3-hour flight from Pennsylvania to Tampa, Florida.  It might seem expensive, but I am sure that I will be happy to be cruising the Western Caribbean instead of dealing with at best a wintery mix at home in Pennsylvania.

I am excited about the money that I will be saving on travel as the result of travel hacking.  Even though it sounds fun, be warned that travel hacking is not for everyone.  Travel hacking is only for those who are ridged and hyper-focused when it comes to managing their personal finances.

If you struggle with paying off your credit card bills every month, travel hacking is not for you.  If you do not have enough in normal monthly spend, travel hacking is not for you.  If you have to try to generate artificial spend to try to earn points, travel hacking is not for you.

Please keep your eye out for my next post in this series on travel hacking.  The next post will be about the Chase Southwest Rapid Rewards Premier Business Card.  I look forward to sharing about how I am getting free flights and to share with you about where we are planning on visiting next.

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