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While a million dollars might not have the purchasing power that it once had, it is still a large sum of money.  If you watch professional sports on ESPN, follow entertainment gossip on TMZ, or read Forbes, you are sure to come across stories about the huge salaries that some high-profile people earn.  NFL quarterbacks earn over $25M per year.  Hollywood actors earn over $22M per movie.  The CEO’s of the Fortune 500 earn 600 times more than
I recently received a letter from the third-party company that manages one of our 403B Plans.  It was the standard quarterly letter that provides updates on account performance, fees, and if there were any changes to the list of mutual funds available to select from.  Since we generally invest in index funds, I normally just do a quick review of the updates and move on. There was a change mentioned in this letter that grabbed my attention.  A
Cars are a necessary expense for most Americans. Unless you are lucky enough to live near a good public transportation system or in a major urban area, you will likely need a vehicle to accomplish tasks of daily living, such as getting to work, buying groceries, or going out to dinner. Buying a car can be expensive, and having a car loan can be a pretty steep financial burden, particularly on top of student loans,
The first time I ever visited an Aldi grocery store was when I was 16 years old.  I just passed the exam for my driver’s license.  One Saturday, I wanted to borrow my grandmother’s car to go cruising with my friends.  She agreed to let me borrow the car for a few hours, but I had to work for the privilege to use it. My job was to go to the market for her.  My assignment was not to
“Behind every great fortune there is a crime”.  - Honore de Balzac I have recently been doing a good amount of research on Peer-to-Peer Lending (P2P) and have written about it in a recent blog post.  Yes, Peer-to-Peer Lending (P2P) is legal in most states, but is it ethical?   While I was researching more about Peer-to-Peer Lending (P2P), I felt a strange nostalgia.  This type of investing caused me to reflect on the town I grew up
(All of the Photos were taken with my iPhone) In my first London on a Budget post, I wrote about the good deal we received when we booked this trip, what some of our plans were for when we went to London, and how much we planned on spending. Our trip to London has now come and gone. It was an amazing trip. In this post, I am just going to share about some of
When I was growing up in the 1980’s, it was common to receive an EE Government Savings Bond for a gift.  My relatives would get them for me for my birthday, when I received a sacrament at church, or for a holiday gift.  At the time, I would have much preferred a video game or almost anything other than a savings Bond. Looking back, my relative’s choice in gifts had my best interest in mind. 
Thank you for reading part-4 in my series on asset allocation.  In my last post, I wrote about our current balanced-growth asset allocation.  That is the asset allocation that we plan on maintaining until we retire in 2028. In this post, I will be considering the future.  This post is about how I foresee our assets being allocated at the time of retirement.  I use the word foresee because it is what I am anticipating.  As I stated in my
Welcome to Part-3 of my series on asset allocation.  In my last post, I wrote about Adding Bonds To Reduce Volatility in the portfolio that my wife and I held for the past ten years.  In this post, I am going to write about our new asset allocation.  This is the allocation that we will hold until we reach early retirement (FIRE). As a Financial Independence (FI) blogger, I have always been a portfolio nerd.  The Lazy Portfolios made
During the first ten years of my investing career, my asset allocation was solely invested in stocks.  From 1997 until 2007, my portfolio returned 8.5%.  I wrote about that period in my first post of this series 100 Percent Invested in Stocks.  In this post, I will write about how adding bonds to my portfolio reduced volatility during the decade that followed. By the year 2007, my portfolio had five years of positive returns.  At that time, I was